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Goodes Doco Shows Why Australia Owes This Legend An Apology

Channel 10 has secured exclusive rights to broadcast the new documentary The Final Quarter and I’m excited, because this is something every Australian should watch.

The doco portrays the end of Adam Goodes’ career, when he was basically booed out of the game.

WHY the boos? Well, some CLAIMED they hated how he “STAGED” for free kicks.

Ya really think?

Image: Shark Island Films.

Here’s a stat to put that into perspective. In 2015 when the booing peaked, Goodes finished equal 195th among all AFL players on the list of free kicks earned.

READ MOREThe Reason Adam Goodes Wasn't At The Premiere Of Doco About His Career

He earned less than a quarter of the free kicks (14) over the course of the season than the leaders with 64.

So if he was staging for free kicks, then it was the first thing in his glittering, dual Brownlow Medal, dual Premiership-winning career that Adam Goodes did really, really, really badly!

And at least 194 other players should have been booed much more than him.

READ MORE: Network 10 To Broadcast Adam Goodes Film: The Final Quarter

Other people claimed the booing couldn't be a racial thing, because the AFL’s 70 other Indigenous players weren’t booed.

But As The Final Quarter makes really clear, Goodes was different. Why? Because he had the guts to take a stand, that's why. Because he looked racism in the eye and wouldn't put up with it. And because he wore his Indigenous culture on his sleeve.

Photo: Ryan Pierse

Against Carlton, Goodes famously mimicked a tribal war dance. In Indigenous Round. In a round of football which celebrates Indigenous culture and the contribution of Indigenous Australians to the game.

Some couldn't cop it. They thought it was aggressive, provocative, even frightening.

How was it any more provocative than, say, the Maori Haka -- a war dance ritual which is widely celebrated on rugby fields?

READ MORE: The Reason Adam Goodes Wasn't At The Premiere Of Doco About His Career

Against Collingwood in 2013, Goodes famously pointed towards a crowd member who called him an ape. There were tens of thousands of people in that crowd. Goodes pointed to the area from which the insult had emanated.

It turned out to be a 13 year-old-girl who delivered the slur, and people ludicrously claimed Goodes bullied her.

No.

Watch the doco. It features large chunks of the Goodes press conference the following day. In it, he expresses sympathy for the girl on -- wait for it -- no fewer than 28 occasions.

Photo: Ryan Pierse

Some of the things he said included:

"It’s not her fault"

and;

"I don’t put any blame on her"

and;

"The person who needs the most support right now is the little girl"

and;

"It’s not a witch hunt. I don’t want people to go after this young girl"

and;

"I just hope that she gets some support"

and;

"People need to cut this girl some slack"

and;

"She’s a young kid. Kids are innocent and I’ve got no doubt in my mind she had no idea what she was calling me last night. We need to help educate her and educate society that things like this are hurtful."

He said a lot more besides all that too in defence of the girl.

Goodes bids farewell to the SCG crowd, a year after he retired. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

There’s a lot of misinformation about Goodes. It’s ALL debunked in this doco. Catch it on soon on 10 and the WIN network, and be angered, but also inspired.

I was lucky enough to see The Final Quarter last week. My reaction? I'd like to be a quarter of the person Adam Goodes is.