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Graeme's Eye Was Watery For Months, He Never Expected What Came Next

Graeme Heward went to the doctor with a watery eye. They initially believed he had dry eyes or a blocked tear duct, but after further testing, they found something much more sinister.

The 58-year-old physiotherapist from Lymm in Cheshire England was diagnosed with cancer of the nasal lining. The father-of-two rapidly started treatment for the shock illness but it proved difficult as he had been feeling the symptoms for eight months beforehand.

Heward faced an incredible 30 separate surgeries to remove the cancer and reconstruct some areas of his face. He lost his right eye, his entire nose and some central areas of his face during the ordeal.

Graeme Heward
Graeme Heward during his treatment. Photo:Twitter/PyhsioRooster.

Heward also endured chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

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"I wasn’t feeling unwell and I didn’t suffer any weight loss, it all started with the watery eye," Heward told the Liverpool Echo.

"When the tumour was discovered, I could actually see the mass up my nose, but doctors originally believed it was benign. Later hearing the tumour was cancer was devastating," he said.

Heward was fitted with a prosthetic eye and nose and he also had the central parts of his face reconstructed.

Graeme Heward
Heward was fitted with a prosthetic eye and nose after his treatment. Photo: JustGiving

In 2017, after seven years of battling cancer, Heward was delivered another devastating blow. He was told the cancer was terminal.

In an incredible show of strength, he decided to make fundamental changes to his life so he could live as long as possible.

READ MORE: Cancer Survivor Gives Back With 'The Big Hug Box'

"I changed my diet, reduced stress in my life, limited my exposure to chemicals, to name just a few," Heward told the Liverpool Echo.

He's also decided to cycle 1,600 kilometres to raise money and awareness for a network of drop-in centres for cancer patients called Maggie's centres. The cycling tour started on May 26 and is expected to last two weeks.

Graeme Heward
Heward on his cycling tour. Photo: Twitter/ Maggies Tour.

Heward plans to visit every single Maggie's centre on his ride including Swansea on the south coast of Wales to Inverness on Scotland's northeast coast.

He's raised 5,906 Pounds (A $10,240) of his 50,000 Pound (AU$91,29) target.

Contact Siobhan at skenna@networkten.com.au