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Woman Injects Herself With Fruit Juice To Get Healthy, Nearly Dies

A 51-year-old woman on a health kick made a smoothie from 20 different fruits and then injected the concoction into her body.

The woman from Zhangzhou, China, immediately started to feel itchy and noticed a rise in temperature, but ignored her symptoms until she fessed up to her husband hours later, according to Xiaoxiang Morning News.

It turns out she'd suffered liver, kidney, heart and lung damage in that time and was at risk of multiple organ failure.

She landed herself in intensive care for five days and miraculously survived.

Doctors put the woman on dialysis and gave her antibiotics and anti-clotting medicine to help nurse her back to health.

IMAGE:  Xiaoxiang Morning News

"I had thought fresh fruits were very nutritious and it would not do me harm by injecting them into my body," she told local media.

"I had no idea that would get me into such trouble."

Not surprisingly, the attending doctor, Liu Jianxiu, has since warned members of the public not to follow any health practices lacking in scientific basis.

Believe it or not, it seems there's a lot of curious people on the internet who have asked for advice about similar 'procedures'.

One Reddit user asked if it was okay to inject orange juice into their veins, while another asked what would happen if they injected Fruit Punch Gatorade.

A Quora member opened the question up entirely, wanting to know what would happen if chicken soup was fed into the bloodstream.

PLEASE TAKE NOTE: Injecting food and drink into your body -- healthy or not -- will probably kill you, not make you stronger.

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READ MORE: How To Eat Healthy When You're Stuck Behind A Desk All Day

READ MORE: Turns Out The Healthy Amount Of Chips Is Six

It's not the first time a crazy wellness method has been tested.

In December last year, a 39-year-old woman was left brain dead after drinking a litre of soy sauce in two hours.

She'd been trying to perform a "soy sauce colon cleanse", which was ultimately an internet hoax.