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British PM Theresa May Rules Out No-Deal Brexit

British Prime Minister Theresa May is reportedly likely to formally rule out a no-deal Brexit in a bid to avoid a rebellion by lawmakers who are threatening to grab control of the divorce process.

May on Tuesday will propose to her cabinet of senior ministers that she formally rules out a no-deal Brexit, opening the door to a delay of weeks or months to the March 29 exit date, The Sun newspaper reported.

The Daily Mail newspaper said May is ready to rule out a no-deal Brexit after as many as 15 ministers said they were ready to resign.

A spokesman for her Downing Street office declined to comment on the reports.

As the United Kingdom's labyrinthine Brexit crisis goes down to the wire, May is making a last-ditch effort to get changes to the separation package but lawmakers will try on Wednesday to impose their authority in a series of parliamentary votes.

After the British parliament voted 432-202 against her deal in January, the worst defeat for a government in modern British history, May has tried to use the threat of a potentially disorderly no-deal Brexit to get concessions out of the EU.

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But many British lawmakers and some of her own ministers have warned they will try to take steps to avoid thrusting the world's fifth-largest economy into a potentially tumultuous economic crisis.

It was not immediately clear how explicitly May would rule out a no-deal. She is due to chair a cabinet meeting and then update parliament later on Tuesday.

(Image: Getty)

With just a month to go until Brexit, the ultimate outcome is still unclear with scenarios ranging from a last-minute deal to another referendum that May has warned would reopen the divisions of the referendum or even scupper Brexit altogether.

Both of Britain's main parties are under intense pressure to change course on Brexit, though both are officially committed to implementing the result of the referendum.

The opposition Labour Party said on Monday it would back calls for a second referendum on Brexit if parliament rejects its alternative plan for leaving the EU.

But the tilt towards another referendum raises problems for Labour, many of whose traditional voters supported leaving the EU.