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Julie Bishop Explains The Moment She Was Left Shocked On National TV

Former Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has spilled on the moment that left her shocked on live television while appearing as a guest panellist on Studio 10.

Known for her infamous death stare, Bishop told the panel the reason behind one in particular.

In 2015, Bishop made an appearance on the ABC's Q&A, and one member of the audience became the subject of the withering look.

Image: ABC Q&A

Bishop explained just what had happened to the Studio 10 panel.

“I remember that moment very well,” she told the panel.

“A woman in the front row swore at me, it was actually a look of shock.

“I was quite taken aback that on national television you could use that word.”

And while Bishop wouldn’t share what that word was, she said it was the moment the "death stare myth" was born.

Bishop called time on her political career on February 21, with a surprise announcement after question time in the House of Representatives.

"I will not re-contest the seat of Curtin at the next election," she said at the time.

READ MORE: J-Bish Calls Curtins On Her Political Career

Bishop shared with Studio 10 what's in store for her in the next phase of her career.

“I’ve had 20 years in a legal career, I’ve had 20 years in a political career, so I reckon there is 20 years left in me for a career in the private sector,” she said.

Bishop floated the idea of going into academia, but said she would always continue with her philanthropy.

As the first female Deputy Leader of the Liberals, Bishop threw her hat in the ring during the leadership spill last year but received just 11 votes.

After the defeat to Scott Morrison, she stepped down as Foreign Minister joining the backbench.

In the months that followed, Bishop called out bullying behaviour in parliament that wouldn't be "tolerated in any other workplace".

READ MORE: Julie Bishop Blasts 'Appalling Behaviour' Of Bullying In Parliament

READ MORE: Why The Liberal Party Women Wore Red

Bishop has questioned the Liberal Party's problem in attracting women to join its ranks.

Bishop first contested the WA seat of Curtin in 1998 and held on to it for the next seven elections.