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Covert Strategies Of William Tyrrell Case Investigators Revealed In Court

The extreme covert strategies police used to elicit a reaction from a person of interest in the disappearance of William Tyrrell have been revealed in court. 

As the criminal hearing for former lead detective Gary Jubelin finally began on Tuesday, the court heard the strike force came up with a unique strategy in 2017.

Detectives placed a Spider-Man suit, similar to the one William was wearing when he vanished, along the bush track where Paul Savage walked almost every day.

They then hid cameras in the bush to watch his reaction.

At the same time, police were tapping Savage’s phones and bugging his house, at Jubelin’s direction.

But Crown Prosecutors allege Jubelin also recorded four private conversations with Savage that weren’t covered by warrants.

“Savage’s privacy was unnecessarily impinged upon by making recordings that were not made in provisions of the act,” the court heard. 

Former NSW Detective Gary Jubelin. Image: AAP

The court also heard a junior officer will testify that Jubelin asked him to make transcripts of the allegedly illegal recordings and pass them off as conversations picked up by the authorised surveillance device in Savage's house.

Jubelin has always denied any wrongdoing.

Jubelin’s court hearing was delayed by a day and a half after the NSW police Commissioner applied to keep much of the evidence a secret, including the strategies used by police investigating William’s disappearance.

Jubelin’s defence barrister Margaret Cunneen strongly opposed the application, telling the court the full facts should be aired to ensure a fair trial.

She also said Jubelin’s alleged offences would “seem a lot worse” if the details were kept from the public, and he would be blamed for the failure of the police investigation.

“He would be set up as a scapegoat for that failure,” she told the court.

The Magistrate decided that there was no need to keep those details from the public, allowing the case to proceed in open court.

The prosecution will continue making their case on Wednesday, including calling several witnesses, before Jubelin can launch his defence.