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Going For A Drive Could Lead To A $1000 Fine

Going for a simple drive to get out of the house could result in a $1,000 fine during the coronavirus pandemic.

NSW Police have cracked down on people who are caught driving without an 'essential' reason to leave home.

On Friday, two women in Sydney’s south-west were pulled over by police after they were seen to be double-parked in a street in Bankstown.

Police said the pair were unable to provide a valid reason for driving, the passenger provided incorrect identification and became argumentative.

She was issued with a fine while the driver was told to move on.

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QLD Police 'Disappointed And Frustrated' After 58 COVID-19 Infringements Issued At Car Rally

Police have slammed attendees of a large rally involving around 150 cars in Brisbane's south overnight, with allegations some tried to flee in their vehicles from officers only be become bogged down in grassland.

A 30-year-old man was also pulled over in Bankstown on Saturday and issued with a fine when he was unable to provide a valid reason for driving.

In Queensland, the state has outlined 14 reasons for a person to leave ‘home confinement’.

Queensland Police told 10 daily that the choice to issue an infringement to a person who had been caught outside the home, even if they are driving, was at the discretion of the police.

National

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QLD Police 'Disappointed And Frustrated' After 58 COVID-19 Infringements Issued At Car Rally

Police have slammed attendees of a large rally involving around 150 cars in Brisbane's south overnight, with allegations some tried to flee in their vehicles from officers only be become bogged down in grassland.

The South Australian government advises that residents should only leave their house for “necessary travel”, such as food shopping, medical care, exercise or work and education.

“When the Prime Minister makes recommendations to the states about restriction guidelines relating to COVID-19, each state must then consider how those recommendations will be applied,” the state government website reads.

“They are not enforceable in South Australia until the State Coordinator, Commissioner Grant Stevens, enacts a Direction.”

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More Than 140 Fined For Breaching Stay-Home Rules In Victoria

Victoria's frontline health workers will have free hotel stays if they need to self-isolate during the coronavirus crises, as the state recorded 20 new cases overnight.

Victorians are currently under stage three restrictions, meaning people are only meant to leave home to get food, for exercise, for medical care or care-giving or for work or education.

Victoria Police have continued to crack down on people flouting the rules, conducting 983 spot checks in the 24 hours to 8 am on Monday and issuing 108 fines.

People can be fined $1652 if they leave home for non-essential reasons and businesses face a $9913 fine if caught doing the wrong thing.

Victoria Police said it would review a learner driver's fine. Image: Getty

A Victorian learner driver was fined $1,600 for going on a driving lesson with her mum because it was not considered “essential” travel.

The teen was learning to drive in wet conditions with her mum supervising in the car when a police officer pulled them over on the weekend.

Speaking to radio station 3AW, the teen's mother said the officer told them they had travelled “too far from home”.

The pair had driven about 30 km from their home in Melbourne.

The teen was given a $1,653 on-the-spot fine for breaching level three restrictions.

On Monday afternoon, Victoria Police said it would review the fine.

"Deputy Commissioner Shane Patton is aware of the incident where a learner driver, on the roads with their mother, was issued with a penalty notice for breaching directions issued by the Chief Health Officer," a police spokesman said.

NSW Police also clarified its position on learner drivers being taken for a lesson during the pandemic.

Under Public Health Orders, a person can only leave their place of residence if they have a reasonable excuse.

‘A reasonable excuse includes travelling for the purposes of work where you cannot work from home, so driving instructors can leave their house for their work – to teach people how to drive,” a NSW Police spokesperson said.

NSW Police said driving instructors could continue to work. Image: Getty

They also likened taking a driving lesson to attending an educational institution where a person cannot learn from home.

“We consider that it would be a reasonable excuse for a person to leave their house to receive driving lessons (either from a driving instructor or a member of their family), given that this is a learning activity that cannot be done from home."

NSW is also allowing family members to supervise learner drivers if they are travelling for any of the listed reasonable excuses for leaving the house, such as driving to the supermarket.