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Parma For A Farmer Drought Fundraiser Is Coming Back

Rural Aid has announced the Parma for a Farmer scheme is back, as the drought crisis continues in much of the country.

The scheme sees $1 from every chicken parmigiana sold at participating venues donated to Rural Aid's Buy a Bale campaign.

The campaign provides much needed supplies -- such as hay bales, fuel for tractors and water for struggling farmers -- and relies on donations.

The 'Parma for a Farmer' scheme went viral last year after Bendigo woman Amanda Kinross posted the idea to Facebook, and was picked up by Rural Aid.

The highly successful campaign saw 1560 venues sign up and raised $1 million.

Rural Aid has bigger dreams for this year, hoping to raise $1.5 million and have 3000 venues register -- and they're already on their way with registrations flowing in already across four states.

Parma
It’s the best melted cheese charity campaign.

READ MORE: Parma For A Farmer Campaign Is Helping Those In Need

READ MORE: What's Keeping Farmers Positive During Tough Times

,“Sadly the drought hasn’t broken so Rural Aid have decided to continue the Parma for a Farmer campaign and build on the success with some added incentives and opportunities for engagement," Charles Alder, CEO of Rural Aid, said in a statement.

This year, the scheme will run throughout the year with venues deciding when and for how long they will take part.

Jacinta Atkins, from the Transport Public Bar in Melbourne, said their bar took part because it can be easy for those living in the city to "forget our country cousins" because they are so far away.

"It’s important for us to recognise what the farmers are going through and raise awareness for them, as they keep us in business with the supply of their produce, including the chicken for our parmas," she said.

"Parma for a Farmer is a great initiative, as everyone loves a parma and you can enjoy one even more than usual, knowing you are raising money to support those who keep us fed.”

Image: Getty Images

Christine McAuliffe, from Adelaide's The Highway, joined up for second time and said it was a "no brainer".

"We decided to be involved with Parma for a Farmer again because The Highway have always prided themselves on using local, fresh produce (for food and wine)," she said.

"Obviously for this to occur we rely heavily on our Farmers, and without them we can’t produce the quality of food that we are accustomed to offering!

Check out their website to find out how you can support Parma for a Farmer.