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Brekky Wrap: Dolphins Found Shot, Stabbed On Popular Beach

All the news you need to know this Wednesday morning.

Wildlife officials in Florida are on the hunt for a dolphin killer after two of the marine mammals were found dead on the beach after being shot and stabbed.

A US$20,000 reward has been offered for information.

Biologists from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission made the first grim discovery off the coast of Naples late last week.

Image: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conversation Commission.

Authorities believe the dolphin was fatally wounded from what appeared to be a bullet and a sharp object, Welsh 2 reported.

During the same week, experts from the Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge recovered a dolphin with a bullet in its left side along Pensacola Beach.

Biologists believe dolphin deaths may stem from humans feeding wild dolphins.

The Federal Government has released a list, identifying the 113 animal species which are in dire need of help following the bushfires.

It is believed the majority of these animals have potentially had at least 30 per cent of their habitat burnt, and many have lost substantially more.

The provisional list includes 13 bird, 19 mammal, 20 reptile, 17 frog, five invertebrate, 22 crayfish and 17 fish species.

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Koalified To Help: How Kangaroo Island Koalas Are Recovering Since The Bushfires

For Kangaroo Island's surviving koala population it's a case of 'rescue or let them suffer', and these kind-hearted volunteers are working hard to make sure as many as possible get on the road to recovery.

The animals were identified based on the extent of which "their range has potentially been burnt", how imperiled they were before the fires - like whether they were already listed as vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered - and the physical, behavioural and ecological traits which influence their vulnerability to fire.

The news comes as experts reveal about 40,000 koalas are believed to have been killed on Kangaroo Island alone, leaving only 5,000 in the area.

Residents on Queensland's coast are bracing for more wild weather, as a cyclone edges closer to the mainland.

Wave heights are predicted to double, flash flooding is expected and heavy rain is forecast to hit tomorrow.

According to the Bureau of Meteorology, Cyclone Uesi is a category three system, currently about 1400km off Australian shores near New Caledonia.

It is expected to approach Queensland before weakening as it moves south.

The news comes as Queensland and New South Wales attempt to clean up the deluge left from the drenching copped during the weekend.

The SES is urging residents to take steps to avoid property damage while those already prepared for flooding should leave sandbags and precautionary measures in place.

Australia is facing a hand sanitiser shortage amid the coronavirus outbreak, but does it actually work? 

Hand sanitisers have been flying off supermarket shelves as the death toll from the coronavirus surges passed 1,000.

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The Deadly Coronavirus Has Been Given A Name To Prevent 'Inaccuracy And Stigma'

The new coronavirus has been named Covid-19 by the director general of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

A new study published in the Journal of Hospital Infection suggests the deadly virus can survive on inanimate surfaces such as plastic, glass, metal, and wood for nine days, Body and Soul reports.

Scientists believe it is also airborne, can travel and is spread by coughing or sneezing.

“The greatest defence we have is to wash our hands. Soap and water is ideal and definitely the first choice," General Practitioner Dr Sam Hay told the publication.

He added that “hands should be washed for at least 20 seconds” and “drying them thoroughly is paramount."

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends washing your hands regularly with soap under running water is the best practice, and if that's not possible, people should use an alcohol-based sanitiser.

Students at more than 250 government-run schools in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are officially done with homework.

As of next week, the Education Ministry is scrapping homework in public schools in the emirates of Dubai and Abu Dhabi to help ensure students have more time for other activities and their families after school.

The UAE is scrapping homework at 250 schools. Image: Getty

However, as part of the changes, there will be no breaks between classes -- which will stretch to 90 minutes long.

The length of the school day will stay the same.

Finland is one nation which has experienced success by implementing a no homework, or less homework rule because it allows children the time to think creatively and play outdoors.

The AFL has clarified it has no plans to change its name after football boss Steve Hocking's hinted at potentially calling the men's competition the AFLM.

During a segment on ABC's The Outer Sanctum, Hocking was asked about the possibility of rebranding the competition to fall in line with the AFLW women's league.

"We are all ears at the AFL," he said.

He added that there's a "whole range" of things the League is currently unpacking "that have just been the way they've been because of 160 years of football."

"I think that's okay," he said.

"I don't think we need to necessarily be looking over the fence at one another and saying whether we need to add another initial to something.

However, the league issued a clarification on Tuesday after widespread reporting of the comments.

"There are no plans to change the name of the AFL competition."