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The Moment A U.S. Coast Guard Raided A Cocaine-Filled Submarine

Incredible footage has emerged of the moment a U.S. Coast Guardsman leaps on to a cocaine-filled semi-submerged submarine in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

It's a video you really have to see to believe.

Two boats and a jet-ski can be seen chasing down a 'narco sub' at pace, as one guardsman yells "Stop your boat now!" in Spanish.

As one boat nears the 12-metre vessel, a guardsman, dressed in a military uniform, pounced onto the sub as waves crash against the hull.

Image: U.S. Coast Guard

He carefully makes his way to the hatch, pounding it several times before it opens, the raised hands of a suspected trafficker emerging from inside.

The video was filmed on June 18 but has only just been released to the public.

READ MORE: Cocaine, Xanax And Ketamine Found In Shrimp

A spokesman for the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area told the Washington Post that more than 7.7 tonnes of cocaine was found on board the vessel, worth roughly $332 million.

Image: U.S. Coast Guard

The submarine was one of 14 separate drug smuggling vessels intercepted off the coasts of Mexico, Central and South America between May and July 2019

The haul included 17 tonnes of cocaine and 423 kilograms of cocaine, with a worth $815.6 million

READ MORE: NSW, Victoria Highest Users Of Cocaine And Heroin: Report

"Make no mistake about it, Coasties, your courageous service is saving American lives," U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said as the drugs were offloaded on Thursday.

"Our administration are determined to SECURE our border!" he later Tweeted.

A  total of 55 suspected drug smugglers were detained during the operation, despite the boats and submarines being stopped in international waters.

Special Agent James Spero of U.S. Homeland Security Investigations confirmed the inspections were legal because the vessels were "not flying a country's flag".

Each of the accused will be prosecuted in their home countries.

The Coast Guard said "purpose-build smuggling vessels like SPSSs are designed to hold large quantities of contraband while evading detection by law enforcement authorities".

Coast Guardsman's efforts form part of a nationwide push to combat drug trafficking out of South and Central America.

Contact the author khill@networkten.com.au