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Aussie Celebs Told Us What They Wear On Flights Following Activewear Controversy

A US fitness model was refused entry to the Qantas business lounge for wearing activewear -- but is it high time we embrace comfort over class?

Natalie Eva Marie took to Twitter to attack the Australian airline for gender discrimination after they deemed her all-red activewear ensemble a violation of their business class lounge dress code.

"In 2020 @qantas airlines Melbourne won’t allow a woman holding a business class ticket to enter their business class lounge in activewear," she captioned a photo of herself wearing fitness tights, runners and a cropped jumper.

"My business IS fitness and an active lifestyle. Qantas prefers their women in a dress."

She quickly followed up with a second tweet clarifying to her 940,000 Twitter followers that her issue is not with dress codes, but gender inequality.

Eva Marie shared a photo of her husband wearing shorts and a t-shirt for comparison, stating that the airline had "no problem" with what the man was wearing.

The Qantas lounge dress code stipulates that "head-to-toe gym gear" is banned. As is "revealing, unclean or torn clothing" and "beachwear".

Qantas have their dress guidelines available on their website. Image: Qantas

The fitness influencer's top and bottom comes from luxury activewear brand Ryderwear, and together retails for a total of $120.

Her look certainly steers clear of your typical daggy tracky dacks, but there's no doubt it fits under the gym gear umbrella.

So were Qantas staff in the right when they banned the ex-wrestler from entering the business lounge? 10 daily asked Aussie celebs to weigh in.

Studio 10 panelists offer up their thoughts on appropriate airport attire. Image: Getty

According to Kerri-Anne Kennerley, Eva Marie's outfit "looks a little revealing in certain areas," and she thinks it's important we adhere to the rules.

A dress code's a dress code.

Kerri-Anne is a big-believer in having a tactical change of clothes when flying.

"If I'm going on an international flight, I then go and change and I put on compression garments and a big t-shirt, and then I'm comfortable. Before I get off the flight, I go and change again."

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Richard Reid agrees that it's important to respect dress codes, but jokes that anything goes on an overnight flight.

Overnight I'm usually wearing my cut-offs, maybe a tube top, and I have my hair in rollers... I don't see a problem, do you?

Narelda Jacobs on the other hand is a big fan of Eva Marie's look: "that's not activewear, that's fabulous!"

The newest addition to the Studio 10 panel is all for a bit of airport fitness fashion, touting the health benefits of wearing something comfortable. But she does offer a hot tip for those out there hoping to haggle their way into the business class lounge. 

If you want to get upgraded to business, you have to look the part.

Twitter was just as divided on the matter as the panelists. Many were quick to jump to the model's defence, agreeing that the staff's behaviour was sexist.

Others however argued that there's no getting around the rules. And while her husband's get-up may have shown off a lot more skin, it doesn't strictly breach the dress code the way her attire does.

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To activewear or not activewear has proven a very hot topic. And while everyone lands differently on the matter, perhaps a bit of compromise is what we need.

When you're headed to the business lounge, you're going to have to stick to the rules. But while on the flight, feel free to rock whatever stretchy, comfy tights you like.

Featured Image: Twitter/Instagram

10 daily reached out to Qantas for comment but had not heard back at time of publication.