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Crowded House Frontman Neil Finn Quits Social Media Following Christchurch Attacks

"For now, I just want to play music."

As the world grapples with the utter devastation of the terror attacks in Christchurch last Friday, one of New Zealand's iconic recording artists is stepping away from social media.

Crowded House's Neil Finn announced on Monday afternoon that, following the awful news last Friday, he had decided to no longer update his personal social media accounts.

Posting to Twitter, Finn wrote that he had made the decision out of respect for the many families grieving the 50 people killed and 50 others wounded.

READ MORE: Can We Stop The Spread Of Hate On Social Media?

READ MORE: New Zealand To Pay For Funerals Of Christchurch Victims

In a follow-up tweet, Finn clarified that this was not an attempt to begin a boycott of social media, but merely a personal decision to step away from platforms he saw as culpable for the spread of hateful ideologies.

https://twitter.com/NeilFinn/status/1107460903937691648?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

Finn has been an avid user of social media -- in 2017 he held live rehearsals and a final recording of his album Out of Silence, broadcast on Facebook Live.

While the "Don't Dream It's Over" singer has made the decision to step away from Twitter, his comments weren't echoed across to other platforms like Instagram and Facebook as yet.

Finn's decision to step away from social media comes after New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern asked for everyone to not give "any oxygen to this act of violence and the message that sat behind it".

"We should not share, spread or actively engage in that message of hate," Prime Minister Ardern continued.

Despite her call not to share any of the message or content from the attacks, Facebook officials reported that they removed 1.5 million videos of the attack from their platform.

News of Finn's decision was met with more heartbreak as many fans reassured him that his was a much-needed voice on platforms like Twitter to cut through the ugliness.

Featured image: Getty Images.